Ask about Local Dive Sites, Florida Keys Hot Spots, Shark Dives, Caribbean Destinations, and International Dive Bucket-List Plans. Reach out via Facebook at facebook.com/tyler.mahler.9 or via email at MyAdventureScuba@aol.com for the latest and greatest dive plans! We will customize a dive experience to meet your needs, budget, skill level, and assist to check sites off your personal bucket list.

 

DIVE PLAN: Decompression Tech Dive x1

13NOVEMBER2019: Wednesday 8:30am: Pompano Beach: Pompano Dive Center

DIVE INFO: Check in at 7:30am

PHONE NUMBER: 954-788-0208

ADDRESS: 101 North Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach, FL 33062

WEBSITE: pompanodive.com

DIVE #1: RONALD B. JOHNSON (270’) This is noted as one of the most unique technical dives in South Florida. Consisting of two wrecks on a single site, the 130' Corey N Chris sits upright with her bow facing west. This former dredge was built in 1942 for the U.S. Army and named BC-246. After a hard career and rusting away she was sold to Broward County to be scuttled as an artificial reef in 1986. The 226' RBJ is sitting with its bow facing south, draped across the midship of the Corey N Chris. This freighter was built in 1955 and after running aground in Kingston Jamaica was abandoned by her owners. Also sold to Broward County, she headed to Pompano to join the Corey N Chris. In 1988, nearly 2 years to the day, the RBJ was sunk next to the Cory N Chris. But instead, she maintained her track record of running into things and landed on top of the Corey N Chris at mid ship. Initially, the hull of the Ronald B. Johnson was fully supported by the Corey N Chris; while the freighter rested on the bottom. The RBJ was suspended at an angle of nearly 45 degrees, rising to within 120 feet of the surface. After years of natural forces, Hurricane Andrew finally split the RBJ in two, leaving the keel of the freighter collapsed fore and aft of its bisection with the Corey N Chris. If you like deep, this is the dive for you. You never know what you'll see...big critters!

 

DIVE PLAN: Decompression Tech Dive x1.5

16NOVEMBER2019: Saturday 6:30am: Pensacola: Jolly Roger Dive Charters

DIVE INFO: Check in at 5:30am

PHONE NUMBER: 850-889-6085

ADDRESS: 1 Greve Rd, Pensacola, FL 32507

WEBSITE: jollyrogerdivecharters.com

DIVE #1: USS ORISKANY (200’) Deep Penetration Technical Dive A one-of-a-kind diving experience, this sunken aircraft carrier USS Oriskany is the largest artificial reef in the world. In 2006 a Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal team detonated 500 pounds of C-4 explosive charges strategically placed on 22 sea connection pipes in various machinery spaces. The ship sank stern first 37 minutes after detonation into the Gulf of Mexico. As was intended, the ship came to rest lying upright. Built shortly after World War II, the “Mighty O” served primarily in the Pacific, earning two battle stars for service in the Korean War and ten battle stars for service in the Vietnam War. USS Oriskany was sunk in 2006, 22 miles south of Pensacola in more than 200 feet of water. Nicknamed “the Great Carrier Reef,” the site is one of the most popular diving destinations in the United States. With a myriad of pelagic and sedentary marine life, opportunities for underwater video and photography are superb. Water depth to the top of the ship is 80 feet, and the flight deck is at 145 feet. There’s plenty of ship to explore above 100 feet, making this a unique dive for a variety of skill levels.

DIVE #2: USS ORISKANY (200’) Advanced Open Water Dive

 

DIVE PLAN: USNS Vandenberg x2

26OCTOBER2019: Saturday 9:30am: Key West: Captain’s Corner

DIVE INFO: Check in at the dock at 9:00am

PHONE NUMBER: 305-296-8865

ADDRESS: 125 Ann St, Key West, FL 33040

WEBSITE: captainscorner.com

DIVE #1: USNS GENERAL HOYT S VANDENBERG (145’) She is a 522’ retired Air Force missile-tracking ship intentionally sunk to create an artificial reef off Key West in May 2009. The bottom of the ship's hull rests on sand in depths that average 145’ but the ship is so massive that the superstructure begins about 45 feet below the surface. Last used by the U.S. Air Force to track missiles and spacecraft became the world's second-largest intentionally sunk artificial reef. Preparation for sinking had taken months of inspections and cleanup to remove contaminants. Workers hauled off more than a million feet of wire, 1,500 vent gaskets, dozens of watertight steel doors, 81 bags of asbestos, 193 tons of potentially cancer-causing substances, 46 tons of garbage that could come loose and float to the surface, 300 pounds of materials containing mercury and 185 55-gallon drums of paint chips. The cleanup was performed at two Norfolk, Va., shipyards before the boat made the 1,100-mile voyage, arriving in Key West on April 22. Permitting was required from 18 local, state and federal agencies. The Vandenberg began as the Gen. Harry Taylor and was later commissioned by the Army as a transport vessel, ferrying troops and supplies from San Francisco to island bases in the western Pacific Ocean in 1944. In 1945, it carried troops home from Europe near the end of World War II. It was later used by the Navy as a transport ship, and was transferred to the Air Force in 1961, when it was renamed the Vandenberg. For about 20 more years, the ship served as a missile tracker throughout the height of the Cold War and was retired in 1983. The world’s largest intentionally sunk artificial reef is the 888’ USS Oriskany, sunk in 2006 off the coast of Pensacola Beach in the Florida Panhandle. The sinking of the 522’ USNS Vandenberg moves the 510’ Spiegel Grove off Key Largo to third on this impressive list.

DIVE #2: USNS GENERAL HOYT S VANDENBERG (145’)

 

DIVE PLAN: USNS Vandenberg x2

27OCTOBER2019: Sunday 9:30am: Key West: Captain’s Corner

DIVE INFO: Check in at the dock at 9:00am

PHONE NUMBER: 305-296-8865

ADDRESS: 125 Ann St, Key West, FL 33040

WEBSITE: captainscorner.com

DIVE #1: USNS GENERAL HOYT S VANDENBERG (145’) She is a 522’ retired Air Force missile-tracking ship intentionally sunk to create an artificial reef off Key West in May 2009. The bottom of the ship's hull rests on sand in depths that average 145’ but the ship is so massive that the superstructure begins about 45 feet below the surface. Last used by the U.S. Air Force to track missiles and spacecraft became the world's second-largest intentionally sunk artificial reef. Preparation for sinking had taken months of inspections and cleanup to remove contaminants. Workers hauled off more than a million feet of wire, 1,500 vent gaskets, dozens of watertight steel doors, 81 bags of asbestos, 193 tons of potentially cancer-causing substances, 46 tons of garbage that could come loose and float to the surface, 300 pounds of materials containing mercury and 185 55-gallon drums of paint chips. The cleanup was performed at two Norfolk, Va., shipyards before the boat made the 1,100-mile voyage, arriving in Key West on April 22. Permitting was required from 18 local, state and federal agencies. The Vandenberg began as the Gen. Harry Taylor and was later commissioned by the Army as a transport vessel, ferrying troops and supplies from San Francisco to island bases in the western Pacific Ocean in 1944. In 1945, it carried troops home from Europe near the end of World War II. It was later used by the Navy as a transport ship, and was transferred to the Air Force in 1961, when it was renamed the Vandenberg. For about 20 more years, the ship served as a missile tracker throughout the height of the Cold War and was retired in 1983. The world’s largest intentionally sunk artificial reef is the 888’ USS Oriskany, sunk in 2006 off the coast of Pensacola Beach in the Florida Panhandle. The sinking of the 522’ USNS Vandenberg moves the 510’ Spiegel Grove off Key Largo to third on this impressive list.

DIVE #2: USNS GENERAL HOYT S VANDENBERG (145’)

 

DIVE PLAN: USNS Vandenberg x2

28OCTOBER2019: Monday 9:30am: Key West: Captain’s Corner

DIVE INFO: Check in at the dock at 9:00am

PHONE NUMBER: 305-296-8865

ADDRESS: 125 Ann St, Key West, FL 33040

WEBSITE: captainscorner.com

DIVE #1: USNS GENERAL HOYT S VANDENBERG (145’) She is a 522’ retired Air Force missile-tracking ship intentionally sunk to create an artificial reef off Key West in May 2009. The bottom of the ship's hull rests on sand in depths that average 145’ but the ship is so massive that the superstructure begins about 45 feet below the surface. Last used by the U.S. Air Force to track missiles and spacecraft became the world's second-largest intentionally sunk artificial reef. Preparation for sinking had taken months of inspections and cleanup to remove contaminants. Workers hauled off more than a million feet of wire, 1,500 vent gaskets, dozens of watertight steel doors, 81 bags of asbestos, 193 tons of potentially cancer-causing substances, 46 tons of garbage that could come loose and float to the surface, 300 pounds of materials containing mercury and 185 55-gallon drums of paint chips. The cleanup was performed at two Norfolk, Va., shipyards before the boat made the 1,100-mile voyage, arriving in Key West on April 22. Permitting was required from 18 local, state and federal agencies. The Vandenberg began as the Gen. Harry Taylor and was later commissioned by the Army as a transport vessel, ferrying troops and supplies from San Francisco to island bases in the western Pacific Ocean in 1944. In 1945, it carried troops home from Europe near the end of World War II. It was later used by the Navy as a transport ship, and was transferred to the Air Force in 1961, when it was renamed the Vandenberg. For about 20 more years, the ship served as a missile tracker throughout the height of the Cold War and was retired in 1983. The world’s largest intentionally sunk artificial reef is the 888’ USS Oriskany, sunk in 2006 off the coast of Pensacola Beach in the Florida Panhandle. The sinking of the 522’ USNS Vandenberg moves the 510’ Spiegel Grove off Key Largo to third on this impressive list.

DIVE #2: USNS GENERAL HOYT S VANDENBERG (145’)

 

DIVE PLAN: Decompression Tech Dive x1.5

16NOVEMBER2019: Saturday 6:30am: Pensacola: Jolly Roger Dive Charters

DIVE INFO: Check in at 5:30am

PHONE NUMBER: 850-889-6085

ADDRESS: 1 Greve Rd, Pensacola, FL 32507

WEBSITE: jollyrogerdivecharters.com

DIVE #1: USS ORISKANY (210’) Deep Penetration Technical Dive A one-of-a-kind diving experience, this sunken aircraft carrier USS Oriskany is the largest artificial reef in the world. In 2006 a Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal team detonated 500 pounds of C-4 explosive charges strategically placed on 22 sea connection pipes in various machinery spaces. The ship sank stern first 37 minutes after detonation into the Gulf of Mexico. As was intended, the ship came to rest lying upright. Built shortly after World War II, the “Mighty O” served primarily in the Pacific, earning two battle stars for service in the Korean War and ten battle stars for service in the Vietnam War. USS Oriskany was sunk in 2006, 22 miles south of Pensacola in more than 200 feet of water. Nicknamed “the Great Carrier Reef,” the site is one of the most popular diving destinations in the United States. With a myriad of pelagic and sedentary marine life, opportunities for underwater video and photography are superb. Water depth to the top of the ship is 80 feet, and the flight deck is at 145 feet. There’s plenty of ship to explore above 100 feet, making this a unique dive for a variety of skill levels.

DIVE #2: USS ORISKANY (210’) Advanced Open Water Dive

 

SPECIAL EVENT: Miami Signature Shipwreck Lionfish Derby to Benefit Miami Dade Reef Guard

WEBSITE: Miami Signature Shipwreck Lionfish Derby

EVENT REGISTRATION PAYMENT OPTIONS

     EventBrite

          Website TBD

     Tarpoon Lagoon Dive Center

          Call 305-532-1445

          Visit 300 Alton Rd, Miami Beach, FL 33139

     Event Organizer – Tyler Mahler – Adventure Charters

          Call 305-457-3519

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CAPTAIN’S MEETING

22NOVEMBER2019: Friday 6:30pm: Miami Beach: Monty’s Sunset on South Beach

ADDRESS: 300 Alton Rd, Miami Beach, FL 33139

           The evening before the derby, participants are encouraged to attend the Captain's Meeting where lionfish biology, ecology, impacts, collecting and handling tools and techniques, and derby rules will be discussed.

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DERBY DAY

23NOVEMBER2019: Saturday Sunrise to 5pm: Miami Beach: Monty’s Sunset on South Beach

ADDRESS: 300 Alton Rd, Miami Beach, FL 33139

           Saturday 5:00-6:00 pm: Scoring and public lionfish tastings

           Lionfish scoring, fillet and dissection demonstrations, games, raffle prizes and other activities will start at 5:00pm

           Awards and raffles with start at 6:00pm

           All lionfish will be sold with to a wholesaler with the proceeds towards the Miami Dade Reef Guard Association

           Official Derby Rules outlined below

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TEAM LIONFISH HUNTERS REGISTRATION & PRIZES

           Team Derby Registration (4 hunters per team) - $100

           Prizes for Largest Lionfish ($500-1st, $250-2nd & $100-3rd)

           Prizes for Most Lionfish ($500-1st, $250-2nd & $100-3rd)

           Saturday Sunrise: Teams may begin collecting lionfish                                                              

           Saturday 5:00 pm: All lionfish must be turned into the scoring station

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INDIVIDUAL HUNTERS REGISTRATION & PRIZES

TWO PRIVATE CHARTERS ABOARD BIG COMM-OCEAN (DECO DIVERS)

PHONE NUMBER: 305-861-6277

ADDRESS: 300 Alton Rd, Miami Beach, FL 33139         

WEBSITE: decodiversmiami.com

           Prize for Largest Lionfish - $250            

           Prize for Smallest Lionfish - $250

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A LA CARTE MENU (select what fits your individual needs)

           Boat Charter - $100 per diver

           Individual Debry Registration - $20 per diver

           PADI Experience Certification - $100 per diver

o          Learn about the facts and myths about the lionfish, how they got here and what we can do to protect our reefs against this invasive species. In the 2-dive specialty course, divers will learn buoyancy techniques, how to hunt without damaging the reef, learn how to control lionfish populations and has a strong emphasis on diver safety. Students are taught how to properly dive with a spear and basic first aid for marine life injuries. This is a great distinctive specialty card to add to your collection!

           Lionfish Gear (Zookeeper, Spear, Shears & Gloves) Purchase – approx $200

           Complete Dive Gear Rental - $35 per diver

           Dive Guide - $50 per diver

           Nitrox Tanks - $10 per tank

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23NOVEMBER2019: Saturday 8:00am: Miami: Deco Divers

DIVE #1: ANDRO (100') This seldom visited wreck was sunk in 1985 and was a luxury yacht that had been converted to a patrol boat for World War II and was used to chase submarines. After the war, she served as a freighter along the Atlantic coast and was eventually seized by Customs for transporting illegal drugs and was scuttled. The ship settled upright in the sand and with a 38’ profile there is plenty to explore at a range of depths. The ship has twin propellers, two smokestacks and a large wheelhouse still intact. Hurricane Andrew broke the ship into three sections and exposed the engine block. This has made the wreck more varied and interesting to explore.

DIVE #2: C-ONE DRIFT (70’) This 110-foot long tug was purchased in 1990 by the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management for use as an artificial reef. The aged tug was stripped of her engine and fittings and towed by the tug Captain Donald from Jacksonville to Miami in preparation for her scuttling. Approximately five miles southeast of the Fort Pierce Inlet, the 60-foot long Captain Donald began taking on water, which flooded her engine room causing the three crew members to abandon ship and the Captain Dan quickly sank beneath them. All were rescued without injury. The still floating C-One was eventually towed to Miami following the dramatic and somewhat ironic event. She was sunk in 70’ off Haulover Inlet in the vicinity of several other artificial reefs. The C-One is straddled by the tug Lady Carmen to the west and the tug White Coast to the east. The two sections of the 155-foot freighter Conception can be found less than 200 feet to the north. Additionally, a 90-foot barge and numerous concrete modules lie a short distance to the southeast.

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23NOVEMBER2019: Saturday 1:00pm: Miami: Deco Divers

DIVE #1: SOUTH SEAS DRIFT (75') One of the more infamous of Miami's artificial reefs, the "South Seas" sits in 73 feet of water off Key Biscayne. This vessel is a 175-foot luxury yacht that was built back in 1928 for the Guggenheim family. It is the sister ship and exact replica of Adolph Hitler's private yacht. The ship changed hands over the years and was even owned by the Woolworth family at one point. By the 1980's the ship had deteriorated greatly, at that time over 50 years old. Although investors bought her to restore her, she sank in a Miami canal and it was finally decided that the ship be donated to DERM, Department of Environmental Resource Management. Sunk in 1983, the South Seas has been scattered across the sand bottom over the years, however, the area is still shrouded by baitfish and barracudas.

DIVE #2: PIPES DRIFT (45') This is actually a "secret spot." These left-over sewer pipes were disposed of just offshore south of Government Cut where they have sort of "stacked up" on top of each other in about 55 feet of water. The growth on the structures is incredible as the open pipes allow uninhibited flow of water and thus nutrients. Oysters, clams, sponges and the associated invertebrates are abundant and growing not only on the outside, but all along the inside of the pipes. Fish congregate on the adjacent reef and moray eels and lobster are a common occurrence here. The inside of the pipes is literally full of gorgonians attached to the sides, making it difficult, but not impossible to swim through. Yes, the pipes are large enough for a diver to comfortably navigate. It is truly amazing how these discarded sewer pipes have turned into a base for prolific life. These all-concrete pipes not only attract varied and numerous marine-life to the area, but if placed closer to shore would also prevent the erosion of the sand beach.